Museums

How can we live forever? Is cryonics—preserving the body after death—more science or science fiction? Curator Katie Dabin reveals the secrets behind cryonics to presenter Alex Lathbridge, using a flask that was built to hold a frozen human head.
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Irving Finkel teaches how to write cuneiform I Curator's Corner Season 4 Episode 8 When presented with a meeting-free Friday afternoon we did what any normal person who has access to Irving Finkel would do - we asked him to teach us cuneiform. We're not really sure Nick learned anything, but hopefully you will.
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Manga: a brief history in 12 works Manga is a diverse and popular art form in which artists tell stories through pictures and words. Japanese manga artists find inspiration for their work in daily life, the world around them, and also in the ancient past. Many people ...
Manga at the Museum 博物館の漫画 I Curator's Corner season 4 episode 7 Nicole Rousmaniere follows on from her episode on Japanese manhole covers with a short discussion on some of the Manga collected by the British Museum.
The Citi exhibition ‘Manga マンガ’ opens 23 May 2019.
To find out more and book ...
Why do clouds have names? Did you know that all clouds are named and classified using a system invented in 1803 by amateur meteorologist Luke Howard?
In this film, Alex Lathbridge talks to curator Alex Rose and finds out why Howard named the clouds and ...
The British Museum Membercast: Halloween The British Museum Membercast is a monthly podcast made available to ‘all studious and curious persons’. Comedian, podcaster and super-fan Iszi Lawrence (The Z List Dead List) presents snippets from exclusive Members’ lectures at the Museum, artfully woven together with ...
Hislop/Iannucci : Trump, Blair, Stalin and post-truth satire Private eye editor and guest curator Ian Hislop talks to Scottish satirist, writer and director Armando Iannucci in an event billed by no one as 'The most important and refreshingly entertaining interview since Frost/Nixon.'
Content warning: Both Ian and Armando ...
The oldest, dateable depiction of the Buddha in human form I Curator's Corner Season 4 Episode 6 Curator Sushma Jansari reckons she's in charge of 'one of the most important objects in the entire British Museum' - and she's not wrong. The Bimaran Casket currently holds the record for the earliest dateable depiction of the Buddha in ...
Rorke's Drift to the British Museum: The story of Henry Hook I Curator's Corner Season 4 episode 5 Henry Flynn recounts the story of Alfred Henry Hook VC, a private in B Company of the 2nd Battalion, 24th Regiment of Foot who served at the battle of Rorke's Drift before becoming an employee of the British Museum.
Parthia V Rome: The battle of Carrhae I Curator's Corner season 4 episode 4 Vesta Curtis recounts one of Rome's most crushing defeats at the hands of the Parthians in 54-53 BC.
Prints of darkness This Halloween, curators Olenka Horbatsch, Susannah Walker and Isabel Seligman have been searching for the supernatural, the scary and the spooky in the collections of our Prints and Drawings department. Scroll down to discover the 10 petrifying prints and disturbing ...
How enzymes change blood types for transfusion Receiving a blood transfusion with the wrong blood type can be deadly because the immune system attacks the unfamiliar blood cells. But scientists from the University of British Columbia are trialing a method to change A, B and AB blood ...
Sun exhibition: curator's art highlights Join our Art Curator Katy Barrett as she explains the art pieces in the exhibition The Sun: Living with our star.
https://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/sun
The orrery: the first mechanical model of the solar system The original orrery c. 1712, made for the Earl of Orrery by John Rowley, London copied from a planetarium model made by George Graham.
Dated 1712--3, this planetary model was made by the London instrument maker, John Rowley. Called an ...
The portable sundial: the travelling time-finder Compendium tablet sundial, brass gilt, with three silvered latitude plates and magnetic compass, signed Christopher Schissler, Augsburg, Germany, dated 1566.
The spectroscope: how helium was discovered The astronomer Sir Norman Lockyer is believed to have used this seven-prism spectroscope to detect the element helium for the first time.
Ordered from the London instrument maker, John Browning in 1868, Lockyer was using the device when he discovered ...
Lucie Green's favourite facts about the sun Watch Lucie Green run through her favourite facts about the sun at the Science Museum's blockbuster exhibition - The Sun: Living With Our Star.
https://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/sun
Sun exhibition: Curator's highlights Join Harry Cliff lead curator of The Sun: Living with our star as he chooses his favourite things to see in our blockbuster exhibition.
https://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/sun
The Byzantine sundial: telling the time in the 6th century This ancient mechanical calendar is the second oldest geared device ever discovered.
It included both a sundial for telling the time and a geared calendar, driven by a dial showing the seven days of the week. Although only these fragments ...
Head of NASA helps launch The Sun: Living With Our Star Jim Bridenstine, Administrator of the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NASA, marks the launch of the biggest exhibition ever about our local star, the Sun, at the Science Museum on 4 October 2018.
“Since the beginning of civilisation, humanity ...

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